How to Work with Sequences - Rummy Strategy for Intermediate Players

How to work with sequences in rummy

How to work with sequences in rummy

Sometimes you might have lost a rummy game despite arranging all your cards. This might happen when you declare without a pure sequence. According to rummy rules, a valid declaration requires at least two sequences, out of which at least one must be a pure sequence. So when cards are dealt, you must sort them quickly and prioritize creating sequences first.

A lot of players often have trouble working with sequences. If you are one of them, don’t worry! Here’s an elaborate tutorial on working with sequences in rummy.

What is a sequence in Indian rummy?

In Indian rummy, a sequence is a group of 3 or more sequential cards of the same suit. As mentioned earlier, at least two sequences are required to make a valid declaration including at least one pure sequence.

What is a pure sequence?

A pure sequence is a group of sequential cards in which no card is replaced by a joker. You must have at least one pure sequence to make a valid declaration.

Examples of pure sequences

Example 1: 2-3-4-5

Example 2: 10-J-Q

Example 3:J-Q-K

Each of the above groups of cards is a pure sequence as all the cards in each group belong to the same suit and are placed in sequence. Moreover, there are no jokers (wild or printed) replacing any cards in the sequences.

What is an impure sequence?

When a joker (wild or printed) is used to replace a missing card in a sequence, the sequence becomes an impure sequence. You can have maximum three impure sequences and still make a valid declaration.

Examples of impure sequences

Example 1:2-3-PJ (printed joker)

Example 2: Q-K-A-7 (Here 7 is a wild joker randomly selected at the beginning of the game.)

Example 3: J-Q-5 (Here 5 is a wild joker randomly selected at the beginning of the game.)

The above groups of cards are impure sequences as each group has a joker replacing a card and the cards in each group are placed in sequence and belong to the same suit.

Examples of Sequences in Rummy

To help you understand sequences better, let us take a look at an example of a points rummy game. Suppose two players are playing at a table and the point value of each point is ₹ 20. The players are dealt the following cards:

Player #1

  • Cards Dealt
  • Cards Sorted
  • 9 32K 5 87 8 10 2 3 Q J
  • J-Q-K|2-3| 2-3|7-9|5-8 | 8-10

Here player #1 has sorted the dealt cards into best possible combinations of sequences and sets. As you can see, the player has created a pure sequence with J-Q-K and a few of the remaining groups are short of one sequential card or a joker to form valid combinations. Since there already is a pure sequence, only 8, A or 4, and 9 or a joker (printed or wild) are required by the player to make a valid declaration.

  • Cards Dealt
  • Cards Sorted
  • 8737A9432KJ58
  • 2-3-4|7-9 -K|7-8|A-3-5|8-J

Here player #2 has created a pure sequence with 2-3-4 and the remaining cards are sorted into best possible combinations. As you can see, the group containing 7 and 9 requires an 8 or a joker to become a pure sequence or an impure sequence respectively. Similarly, the group of 7 and 8 requires either a 6, a 9 or a joker, and the group of A and 3 requires either a 2, 4 or a joker to form sequences.

Creating an Impure Sequence

Round 2

It is player #1 turn to pick the card from the closed deck.

Player #1

  • Action
  • Cards Sorted
  • Now the player picks a printed joker, which can be arranged with 7-9 or 8-10 to form an impure sequence. So he places it with 7-9 and in turn discards 3.
  • J-Q-K|2-3-4|7-9-PJ|5-8
    | 8-10

Player #2

  • Action
  • Cards Sorted
  • The player picks 5 which is not useful to him/her as it cannot be arranged in any group to create valid combinations. So he discards it and waits for his next turn.
  • 2-3-4|7-9-K|7-8|A-3-5|8-J

Creating an Impure Sequence

Round 2

It is player #1 turn to pick the card from the closed deck.

Player #1

  • Action
  • Cards Sorted
  • Now the player picks a printed joker, which can be arranged with 7-9 or 8-10 to form an impure sequence. So he places it with 7-9 and in turn discards 3.
  • J-Q-K|2-3-4|7-9-PJ|5-8|8-10

Player #2

  • Action
  • Cards Sorted
  • Now the player gets 4. He keeps the card to form 3-4-5,which is a pure sequence, and discards A.
  • 2-3-4|7-9-K|7 -8|A-3-5|8-J

Note: Both the players played according to the cards they draw on their turn. In this round, player #1 was able to create an impure sequence, being short of only one combination to make a valid declaration. On the other hand, player #2 was able to form a pure sequence and requires two more combinations to declare.

Making a Valid Declaration

Round 3

It is player #1 turn to pick the card from the closed deck.

Player #1

  • Action
  • Cards Sorted
  • Now player #1 picks up a 9 and uses this card to create the last required combination with 8 and 10 . Again, this is a pure sequence and it qualifies the player to make a valid declaration. However, the player cannot declare his/her cards, unless he/she gets rid of 5 and 8. So the player discards 5.
  • J-Q-K|2-3 -4|7-9-PJ|8|8-9-10

Player #2

  • Action
  • Cards Sorted
  • Now the player gets 4. He keeps the card to form 3-4-5, which is a pure sequence, and discards A.
  • 2-3-4|7-9-K|7-8|A-3-5|8-J

Round 4

Player #1

  • Action
  • Cards Sorted
  • Now the player gets an A. This card can be used in the meld J-Q-K. As 3 to 4 sequential cards of the same suit make a pure sequence, the player can use it to create a valid sequence. With this card, the player finishes arranging all the cards and places 8 in the discard slot.
  • J-Q-K-A|2-3-4|7-9-PJ|8-9-10

Player #2

  • Action
  • Cards Sorted
  • He picks a Printed Joker but till the time he arrange his cards, Player #1 has already declared his cards.
  • 2-3-4|7-9-K|7-8|345|8-J

Result:

As player #1 has created 3 pure sequences and 1 impure sequence, the declaration is valid. So player #1 wins the game and gets zero points as the overall score.

On the other hand, player #2 has 2 pure sequences and 7 ungrouped cards. So player #2 loses the game and gets a penalty of 60 points (7+9+10+7+9+8+10).

The winnings of Player #1 will be 60 x 20 = ₹1200.

Note: note that it is not necessary to have more than one pure sequence to win a game. An ideal combination consists of one pure sequence, another pure or one impure sequence and two sequences or sets. This will depend on the type of cards you get during the game.

We hope this tutorial helped you understand the ways to form sequences in rummy card games. To have better understanding, it is important to play practice matches. Go for rummy game download to play unlimited practice games using free chips!

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